Strategic Options

A.  Fundamental Realities

      1.  The HLC must maintain a cooperative relationship with the governmental entities it serves.  Therefore, it should take its lead from Mecklenburg County, Charlotte, Huntersville, Cornelius, Davidson, Pineville, and Matthews.  It should certainly not work at cross purposes with the governments it serves.   

      2.  The Historic Landmarks Commission receives all its funding from Mecklenburg County.  The Commission staff has labored long and hard to establish a relationship of trust with Mecklenburg County.  That relationship greatly benefits the work of the Historic Landmarks Commission
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      3.  The Commission is primarily responsible for identifying and working to preserve individual properties of special significance.  It should always retain that focus.  It can certainly take secondary benefits into account:  e.g., open space preservation, economic development, affordable housing, neighborhood revitalization.
   
      4.  The Commission has three essential powers.  

           a.  To recommend to local governing boards that properties be designated as historic landmarks. 

           b.  To exercise design review over proposed material alterations of historic landmarks. 

           c.  To acquire and sell the fee simple or any lesser included interest in historic landmarks or contributing properties in local historic districts.

      5.  The Commission operates the largest local publicly-funded historic preservation revolving fund in the United States.

      6.  The Commission has a staff of three and one-half.  The workload of the Commission is already substantial.

      7.  The Commission already has major projects underway.

           a.  Restoration of the Charles E. Barnhardt House.

















​           b.  Acquisition and Sale of Former Charlotte Fire Station 10 and Dowd House.













           c.  Acquisition and Sale of Holly Bend.















           

        
          d.  Walnut Avenue Project





















          e.  Sale of Torrence Lytle School

   
















B.  Strategic Options.  The options outlined below assume that there are three components of the Commission's work that can most easily be modified.  They are:  advocacy and education, processing properties for historic landmark designation, and revolving fund projects.  Design Review will be the same in all options.
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    Option One.  Complete Existing And Potential Projects And Recommend Historic Landmark Designation For Study List Properties That Best Meet The Criteria For Designation:  1) Historical Significance, 2) Level Of Endangerment, and 3) Economic Viability.  The Commission Shall Seek Input From The Governmental Entities It Serves.

     Option Two.  Complete Existing And Potential Projects And Recommend Historic Landmark Designation For Study List Properties That Best Meet The Criteria For Designation:  1) Historical Significance, 2) Level Of Endangerment, 3) Economic Viability, and 4) Which Have A Secondary Benefit e.g. Land Conservancy, Affordable Housing, Outlying Town Preservation, Neighborhood Revitalization, Economic Development.  The Commission Shall Seek Input From The Governmental Bodies It Serves.


     Option Three.  Complete Existing And Potential Projects And Recommend Historic Landmark Designation For Study List Properties That Best Meet The Criteria For Designation:  1) Historical Significance, 2) Level Of Endangerment, 3) Economic Viability, and 4) Which Have A Secondary Benefit e.g. Land Conservancy, Affordable Housing, Outlying Town Preservation, Neighborhood Revitalization, Economic Development.  The Commission Shall Actively Pursue New Revolving Fund Projects, Including Securement Of Preservation Easements, To Secure The Benefits Outlined Above.  The Commission Shall Seek Input From The Governmental Bodies It Serves. Requires Additional Staff


     Option Four.  Complete Existing And Potential Projects And Recommend Historic Landmark Designation For Study List Properties That Best Meet The Criteria For Designation:  1) Historical Significance, 2) Level Of Endangerment, 3) Economic Viability, and 4) Which Have A Secondary Benefit e.g. Land Conservancy, Affordable Housing, Outlying Town Preservation, Neighborhood Revitalization, Economic Development.  The Commission Shall Actively Pursue New Revolving Fund Projects, Including Securement Of Preservation Easements, To Secure The Benefits Outlined Above.  The Commission Shall Become A More Assertive Advocate For Historic Preservation Projects, Such As The Lakewood Trolley Project, And Shall Conduct Workshops Explaining The Developmental Aspects Of Historic Preservation, e.g., Design Review Regulations, Tax Credits and Deferrals.  The Commission Shall Seek Input From The Governmental Bodies It Serves.  Requires Additional Staff



Video Addendum

Explanation of North Carolina Historic Preservation Commissions


      
Dr. Dan L. Morrill
139 Middleton Drive
Charlotte, N.C. 28207
 
[email protected]
 
704-574-3861
 
 
R. J. Reynolds High School - 1956
Wake Forest University - 1960 (B.A.)
Emory University -  1961 (M.A.)
Emory University - 1966  (Ph.D.)
 
Professor Emeritus of History UNCC
Director, Charlotte-Mecklenburg 
                  Historic Landmarks
                  Commission